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Wrongful Termination Archives

Television anchor alleges discrimination in wrongful termination

Wrongful termination cases reach all industries and professions in Missouri and elsewhere in the United States. After being terminated, allegedly for statements he posted on Facebook regarding the Internal Revenue Service, long-time St. Louis television anchor man Larry Conners sought a restraining order from a judge on a non-compete clause in his employment contract with the station that fired him. In other words, after being fired, the station is now asserting the non-compete contract provision, effectively preventing Conners from gaining employment in the television industry. Conners contends that his termination was long in the works, and the real reason behind it was his age as opposed to the stated reason of his postings on Facebook about the IRS.

School superintendent wins wrongful termination suit

A Missouri school superintendent has won a wrongful termination suit against the school district. The District Judge for the Missouri Court of Appeals stated that the district had failed to produce documents that had been requested by the superintendent and his legal aid. However, the school district's representation stated that they had thousands of items of documentation, and they would have been able to provide what was necessary for the case.

Court rules that liquor distributor was wrongfully terminated

In late June, a St. Louis Circuit Court ruled in favor of a St. Louis-based liquor distributor in a wrongful termination lawsuit against a supplier. This is one of multiple claims associated with an ongoing battle surrounding the Missouri Franchise Law, a fight which is being referred to as the "liquor wars." The Court ruled that the distributor's relationship with the supplier was a franchise relationship and that the distributor was a victim of wrongful termination. Citing a section of the Missouri Franchise Law that has been much criticized during the course of the litigation, the Court held that a "community of interest" existed between the supplier and distributor.

School held in contempt of court in wrongful termination suit

A Missouri public school system has been ordered to pay sanctions to its former superintendent after the school district failed to produce evidence in a wrongful termination suit and was ruled in contempt of court. The suit began in 2009 after the superintendent claimed he was forced to resign because he refused to provide false information in a separate legal issue involving the Missouri Public Schools Retirement System.

In vitro fertilization discrimination case move toward trial

A teacher at a Catholic school claims she was fired from her job because she underwent in vitro fertilization. She has filed suit against the Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend for wrongful termination. Readers in Missouri may be interested in the issue because it's being tried in federal court, and the outcome could decide the constitutional balance between religious and reproductive rights.

Teacher fired after mother's obituary

Missouri residents may be surprised to learn that the contents of a parent's published obituary could lead to the loss of a job, but that is exactly what one woman says happened to her. The woman claims she was fired from her job at a Catholic school after her mother's obituary included the name of her same-sex partner. She is now considering taking legal action against her former employer for wrongful termination.

Ex-employees sue Christian school for religious discrimination

Missouri residents may be interested in an unusual wrongful termination case proceeding in another state. On April 22, nine former employees of a Christian school in Pennsylvania filed a lawsuit in federal court, alleging that they were illegally fired because of their religious beliefs. The group includes managers, teachers and other staff members. The wrongful termination suit seeks reinstatement in the staff members' respective positions, plus back pay for the time they were not working.The school is a charter school founded by a church known as Petra International Ministries. The complaint alleges that the employees who were terminated are all members of the church; the founding member was reportedly removed by the board in June 2012. The plaintiffs were all fired a short time later.

Woman sues after being fired for premarital sex

Missouri residents who are interested in workplace discrimination issues may be intrigued by the recent case of a woman who allegedly was fired from her job at a Christian college after her employer learned of her out-of-wedlock pregnancy. She has hired prominent attorney Gloria Allred to sue the school. Last fall, the woman was called into her supervisor's office to respond to rumors that she was pregnant. When she confirmed the pregnancy, she says she was fired. She now claims she was wrongfully terminated. The college says it fired the woman for violating the terms of a two-page contract she signed that prohibited immoral behavior including, among other things, premarital sex. While the woman acknowledges signing the agreement, she says the school applied its rules unfairly. After firing the woman, the school proceeded to offer a job to her then-fiancé, despite being aware that he also had premarital sex. The two have since married.

Drama coach removed after "racy" performance

A part-time drama coach was removed from her position although she was never formally reprimanded after she led students in a production of "Legally Blonde: The Musical," prompting parental complaints about the content of the show. This wrongful termination occurred after the performance had been approved by two different principals and without warning to the drama coach. Students rallied to support the discharged teacher, urging the district to reconsider their actions. The director had a strong history of leading great musicals with record-breaking attendance. After initial parent complaints about some of the show's content, the director changed a few lines to accommodate these sensitivities. However, three weeks later, she was told to resign, or she would be fired. 

Wrongful termination findings may be enforced by court

The Missouri Human Rights Act was designed in part to protect workers from discriminatory employment practices. The Missouri Human Rights Commission, which is charged with investigating workplace discrimination and providing remedies for the victims, filed a lawsuit to enforce a wrongful termination judgement against Ashcraft & Associates Electrical Contractors, Inc. The company was ordered to pay an unfairly terminated worker $42,534.50, and it has so far failed to do so. The worker was an electrician hired via the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers chapter located in Springfield. Several individuals heard the employer reference the worker's medical condition when discussing the termination. One of these individuals was a union dispatcher who was later told by the union's lawyer that the termination was illegal under the Americans with Disabilities Act.